Officials stand by the University Loop and Aggie Road intersection Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, at the Arkansas State University campus in Jonesboro, Ark. An armed man who had posted on Facebook that he was homicidal drove onto the campus Thursday, sparking a lockdown before police took him into custody, university and police officials said. (Staci Vandagriff/The Jonesboro Sun via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Officials stand by the University Loop and Aggie Road intersection Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, at the Arkansas State University campus in Jonesboro, Ark. An armed man who had posted on Facebook that he was homicidal drove onto the campus Thursday, sparking a lockdown before police took him into custody, university and police officials said. (Staci Vandagriff/The Jonesboro Sun via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Brad Kenneth Bartelt, charged recently with “aggravated assault, terroristic threatening, possession of explosive material and carrying a firearm in a publicly owned facility” was also, according to himself, taking psychiatric and pain medication.

The 47 year old man, in possession of a 12-gauge shotgun, drove onto the Arkansas State University campus with containers of gasoline and propane. He called 911, informing the dispatcher that he was on the campus and had a gun, with which he threatened to shoot the tank of propane.

The incident caused a campus lockdown. Afterwards, Bartelt admitted his original purpose was to shoot other people, but thankfully he “changed his mind” and planned on suicide instead.

He was arrested before he killed himself.

What ties this man to other potential or actual homicidal incidents in the past several years is his stated involvement with psychiatric drugs.

After his arrest, Bartelt said he had been “seeing demons” in the woods around his home, and attempted to photograph them.

In a recent Facebook post, Bartelt stated he was feeling homicidal and suicidal.

Apparently this man was upset over an injury he suffered in 2012 that happened while he was training to drive an 18-wheeler at the Newport Campus of Arkansas State, 45 miles from where the incident occurred.

Although Bartelt did not harm anyone this time, the fact that he is to be “evaluated mentally” while under arrest does not bode well. The modus operandi of modern psychiatry is treatment using drugs with possible suicidal and homicidal side effects, and his potential release back into society with a “new prescription” for a psychiatric drug is something to be concerned about.

Prisoners Treated with Psychiatric Drugs 

Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) data in 2014, the USA’s largest prisons system spent over $36.5 million on psychotropic drugs going back to 2010. About 10% of all inmates receive medications for psychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and acute schizophrenia.

The total of federal inmates on psychotropic drugs was around 20,000 last year.

In 2006, a Justice Department analysis asserted that 45% of federal inmates had a mental health problem.

On The Medical Whistleblower Advocacy Network site, a site defending human rights according to various UN Legal instruments, the following information was given regarding the overuse of psychiatric drugs.

“Psychiatric medications frequently cause severe side effects, some of which can be irreversible and for other patients these psychotropic medications fail to help patients…”

The site goes on to explain how one side effect, akinesia, “is typified by drowsiness and the need to sleep a great deal.  This effect is appreciated by those wishing to chemically restrain patients and prevent their moving around or demanding care in the middle of the night.  But this allows caretakers to ignore patient’s problems and use ever increasing amounts of drugs to achieve the desired ends.  This is not treatment of the underlying disease but instead forced drugging for the convenience of the caretakers.  In addition, polypharmacy, which is the prescribing for a single person of more than one drug of the same chemical class (such as antipsychotics), is widely practiced despite little empirical support, and can result in serious adverse reactions and intensified side effects and can lead to early death.”

With psychiatrists holding the reigns of authority on who in the prison population is mentally ill (despite having no actual cures for mental illness) the treatment of those unfortunately designated as mentally ill is not likely to change anytime soon.

Without question, dosing a criminal with psychiatric drugs that have severely negative health, suicidal or homicidal side effects is not only cruel, it is extremely dangerous.

SOURCES:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/gunman-arksansas-state-campus-feeling-suicidal-article-1.2463437

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/07/24/prisoners-mental-illness/13093899/

http://medicalwhistleblowernetwork.jigsy.com/psychiatric-drugs-side-effects-